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Phrases and Words in Careers Page 14 - find Articles, facts, Phrases, and information about : Careers. This dictionary is Free to use

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Showing results 131 to 140 for '' of about 300
Card shark
Card-shark.html
Card shark: Skilled professional card-player cardsharp, dishonest card-player
Cardshark
Cardshark.html
Cardshark: Skilled professional card-player cardsharp, dishonest card-player
Careenage
Careenage.html
Careenage: A race course: the ground run over. To go back again the same career. Sir P. Sidney. A running full speed a rapid course. When a horse is running in his full c
Career development
Career-development.html
Career development: Professional advancement, development of professional skills
Career soldier
Career-soldier.html
Career soldier: Soldier who has chosen the army as his profession
Careerism
Careerism.html
Careerism: Excess devotion to ones career (resulting in neglect of other personal issues, such as ones family)
Careerist
Careerist.html
Careerist: Professional who pursues a career one whose chief goal is professional advancement
Caretaker
Caretaker.html
Caretaker A person who is employed to look after a place or thing, often this includes a building or piece of land. A caretaker government.
Carpenter
Carpenter.html
Carpenter A person skilled in woodwork in buildings and homes. Verb: to do the work of a carpenter. To make of fit something together.
Carriage
Carriage.html
Carriage: That which is carried burden baggage. [Obs.] David left his carriage in the hand of the keeper of the carriage. Sam. xvii. 2 And after those days we took up our
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