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Showing results 21 to 30 for 'E' of about 300
E.M. Forster
E.M.-Forster.html
E.M. Forster: Edward Morgan Forster (1879-1970), English author (famous for his novels "Passage to India ", "Howards End" and "A Room with a View")
E.T.
E.T..html
E.T.: 1982 film directed by Steven Spielberg about a space alien that lands on Earth
E.t.c.
E.t.c..html
E.t.c.: Etcetera, continuing in the same way, and so forth, and so on
E12 error
E12-error.html
E12 error: Error indicating the loss of only one recoverable data bit on a compact or hard disk
E=MC2
E=MC2.html
E=MC2: Famous formula compiled by Albert Einstein expressing his theory that energy and matter are equal and the speed of light is a constant
Each
Each.html
each: Every one considered individually. ie. "To each his own" Adverb: To or from every one of two or more. "Each person made the final."
Each and every one
Each-and-every-one.html
Each and every one: Every single person, every solitary individual
Eachwhere
Eachwhere.html
Eachwhere: Everywhere. [Obs.] The sky eachwhere did show full bright and fair. Spenser.
Eadweard Muybridge
Eadweard-Muybridge.html
Eadweard Muybridge: (1830-1904) British-born American photographer, inventor of an early projector known as the zoopraxiscope
Eager
Eager.html
Eager: To have a keen desire to participate. To be extremely enthusiastic "showing great excitement and interest". Eager beaver: To be hard working and extremely eager
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